Jen’s story.

My name is Jennifer Hazi, I am a Registered Midwife, Doula and childbirth educator. I work as a midwife in a busy suburban hospital in Sydney, privately with women and their families in their homes and facilitate a monthly space for pregnant women and their female support people which is a unique mix of education, connection and space for women to process the changes and expectations where they are in pregnancy.

I fell in love with birth sometime during my first pregnancy in 2005. Over the course of my pregnancy, the fear I didn’t even know I had was slowly educated away and a fascination with the body’s ability to grow, birth and nurture a baby with very little help from outside.

I began my work as a doula, training with an experienced doula in a mentor/mentee relationship. After a year of working together under the nurturing eye of an experienced doula, and completing the Optimum Birth training for good measure, the launch into private practice was smooth and joyous.

My hunger for all things parturition continued into my direct entry Bachelor of Midwifery at UTS. While studying I juggled childbirth education, working as a doula and my growing family. I am fortunate to have worked with women in continuity not just through one pregnancy but over the course of their childbearing career and being invited into such an intimate and incredibly life-affirming space with new families is a continual privilege.

I now have 5 witty and vivacious girls who keep me busy and work clinically as a midwife in a large tertiary referral hospital in Sydney. I absolutely love working as an educator and working with women and their families as they discover their own fears about birth are dissolved with good information, a space to reflect and time. I work privately with women and families wherever suits them antenatally, and postnatally in their home. Occasionally I attend births as a doula, however, at this stage, I try to “pay it forward” and bring a newly qualified or student doula with me. I have begun to play with photography and filmmaking more to fulfil my creative needs (far from professional!!), and my only regret is I didn’t start sooner.

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So what are my passions? My family is number 1. Having 5 daughters definitely gets me thinking more than ever about women, our empowerment and how to ensure the road is smoother for the next generation. I am fortunate to have found a profession which is also my hobby. I know many of you feel the same way. I truly believe doulas are an underused resource for women and their families in both the birth space and the postnatal period. I know for myself what a pleasure it is to work with compassionate and caring doulas and how much physical and emotional support in the postpartum can have such a positive effect years later.

I really believe we, as midwives, doulas, obstetricians, childbirth educators, birth photographers, postnatal support people, birth workers and all of us in the perinatal space have a massive responsibility to protect the future by providing care in the most respectful and uplifting way possible.

Words: Jen Hazi

7 copy.jpg(It’s pretty difficult finding a non-pregnant pic of me but I did it.)

 

The one guaranteed way to be the best doula you can be.

(Not that I’m prone to hyperbole)

In all seriousness, there is a fundamental skill which separates the passionate, well meaning doula from the insightful, effective and professional one. That skill is reflective practice.

What reflective practice isn’t:

  • Rehashing bad scenarios.
  • Relying on your own knowledge and experience to help you make sense of every situation.
  • Unfocused and undirected remembering and daydreaming.
  • Journaling (although that is a good start).

 

Ok, so what is it?

  • A framework for thinking.
  • A tool to help structure your learning needs 
  • The ability to turn every experience into a growth opportunity.
  • Really rewarding. Once you see what a difference it makes it is hard to stop!
  • Vital for doulas who are working independently or in isolation.

Emergency training for Doulas

Why does a doula need to learn about obstetric emergencies?

 Doulas are NOT medical professionals. Clinical care of the woman and baby is directly outside of our scope of practice. Clearly defining ourselves as non-clinicians is vital to safe practice.

However, we are there on the frontline. We are with women in the dark of night as they labour at home. Women are told to stay home as long as possible so they turn to us and ask for our support and help before they present to their care provider. We know labour is predictably unpredictable and although we do everything we can to direct women to their care provider there are a few, random situations where timely intervention can save lives.

Many professions have first aid requirements, and no doubt many qualified doulas have undergone some kind of first aid training.  An understanding of emergencies for doulas is important.

It is not appropriate for a doula to attend the kind of emergency training midwives, obstetric nurses and doctors attend. Their role in most emergencies is very different. Understanding a few scenarios that doulas may see might give them the insight to recognise when to call for emergency assistance.

Consider the following scenarios:

If a pregnant woman was to collapse at home in early labour what would you do? After calling for an ambulance, you may be asked to assist the ambulance officer on the phone. If you have an understanding of emergencies then you will feel more prepared to assist.

Supporting a woman in the home quickly turns into a precipitous labour and there is no time to get to the hospital. You have called for an ambulance but the baby is born stunned and not breathing. What do you do while you wait for help?

Moments after the birth of a baby the woman in your care begins to haemorrhage. Staff quickly flood the room to help her. How can you help her partner? Is there anything you can do to support the baby?

This is a course about obstetric and neonatal emergencies completely devoted to the unique needs of doulas.

Experienced doulas may have (unfortunately) come across these sorts of scenarios in the past. However, these skills need to be practised, to keep current, particularly when we don’t use them very often. If you are a newly qualified (or qualifying) doula, learning about emergencies and hearing from more experienced doulas can help equip you with ideas and skills if you ever need them in you (hopefully) long and rewarding career.

See our flagship course: Emergencies in Childbearing for Doulas and Birth Workers HERE

 

Emergencies In Childbearing

Advanced Skills, Knowledge, & Technical Training For Doulas Who Want to Be Confident, Calm And Know Exactly What To Do In Emergency Situations.

The Emergencies In Childbearing course is the first of its kind in Australia and has been developed specifically for Doulas who want to:

  • Be more prepared, confident and calm in emergency situations
  • Undergo specific training and role play of your role in emergency situations
  • Be able to detect common warning signs during pregnancy, labour and post delivery
  • Be acknowledged and respected by other birth professionals as a valued team member in emergency situations
  • Better understand the ethical, legal and professional role of the doula in an obstetric emergency

Unlike other courses about maternal & neonatal emergencies, this course is designed with the needs of the doula in mind. Learn what you need to know to serve women and families in your care.

The feedback from Doulas, midwives and other birth professionals about this course has been incredible so far, and we are so confident that you’ll love and appreciate the training that we are offering a 100% Money Back Guarantee.

Then please click here for full details, pricing and a course preview.

Hear what doulas and midwives are saying about this course:

Sheryl Sidery –
Well known and respected Independent Midwife, Clinical Midwifery Educator and Senior University Lecturer UTS, Sydney Australia

Ellen Turchini 
Mother of three, Social Worker, Qualified Doula ADC, Sydney Australia

Jane Hardwicke Collings
Internationally acclaimed Midwife and founder of  The School of Shamanic Womancraft and International Women’s’ Mysteries School, Author of Ten Moons and Herstory.

Sam Gunn –
Mother of four, Accountant, Qualified Doula ADC, Sydney Australia

 Have you seen the course outline?

You can see it all here.

 

4 Main Reasons You Need This Course:

 

  1. So you can confidently provide potentially life-saving assistance in emergency situations where you are the only birth professional present.
  2. To ensure a woman’s wishes, dignity and wellbeing a respected during an emergency.
  3. To be able to understand, communicate and assist other birth professionals during an emergency. Doulas who undertake our course are highly respected and sought after by other birth professionals.
  4. To ensure you remain calm, confident and do not become traumatised or burnt out after during and after an obstetric emergency.

A Supportive Community For Professional Doulas
As well as learning these advanced techniques and trainings, and being given the necessary tools and role play examples to implement what you learn in pressure situations, you’ll also benefit by becoming a member of our supportive, professional doula community.

At the end of each module in this course there is a comments section where we discuss the lessons and you can ask questions and have your peers, and also Jacki and Jennifer provide feedback, stories and helpful insights to what you have just learned.

Our active facebook group is also a great place to support each other and discuss topics around all aspects of being a doula (including professional and business development) and empowering women during pregnancy and childbirth.

Join our facebook group here for a really supportive and caring doula community, keen to learn and expand their knowledge